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Parent Involvement

Summer Fit Activities knows that as a parent, you want to be involved with your child's education - we also know how busy life can be, especially at home during the summer! By taking an interest in their development over the summer you are showing your child that their education and health is important - regardless if they are in school or out for vacation! 

Summer Fit is designed so your child can progress through the book at their own pace with as much independence, or parental involvement as you can provide. Incentive Contrat Calendars build self-motivation and goal-setting skills, and makes completing activities and exercises flexible and fun. This is great news because it means your child will complete the book without being overwhelmed, maintain the skills they have previously learned, and have a running start for the new school year.

 

Parent and Schools

Research supports what teachers instinctively know -  Students perform better academically and socially when parents and schools have positive and interactive relationships.

Here are several studies that explore the critical home - school connection:

Parent involvement in education is crucial. No matter their income or background, students with involved parents are more likely to have higher grades and test scores, attend school regularly, have better social skills, show improved behavior, and adapt well to school.

National Coalition for Parent Involvement in education. 2006. Research Review and Resources. Retrieved September 16, 2011

Regardless of family income or background, students whose parents are involved in their schooling are more likely to have higher grades and test scores, attend school regularly, have better social skills, show improved behavior, and adapt well to school.

Henderson, A.T., and K.L. Mapp. 2002. A New Wave of Evidence: The Impact of School, Family, and Community Connections on Student Achievement. National Center for Family and Community Connections with Schools, Southwest Educational Development Laboratory.

The most accurate predictors of student achievement in school are not family income or social status, but the extent to which the family creates a home environment that encourages learning, communicates high yet reasonable expectations for the child’s achievement, and becomes involved in the child’s education at school.

National PTA. 2000. Building Successful Partnerships: A Guide for Developing Parent and Family Involvement Programs. Bloomington, Indiana: National Education Service, 11–12.

When parents are involved at school, the performance of all the children at school, not just their own, tends to improve. The more comprehensive and well planned the partnership between school and home, the higher the student achievement.

Henderson, A.T., and Nancy Berla. 1995. A New Generation of Evidence: The Family Is Critical to Student Achievement. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Education, 14–16.